National Hockey League

New York Sport

Boasting some of the USA’s top sports teams, acres of parkland and beaches and state-of-the-art sports complexes, New York is a sports hotbed, offering the very best in spectator sports and a comprehensive array of activities for lovers of the great outdoors. The city’s best indoor participant sports venue is the ultra-modern Chelsea Piers Sports & Entertainment Complex, a 12-hectare (30-acre) facility situated on four beautifully restored early 20th-century piers at 23rd Street at West Side Highway, on the Hudson River. The complex has everything from a rock-climbing wall to an inline skating rink.

 

Visitors interested in tickets to the top sporting events in the city should book in advance, as seasonal sell-outs are not uncommon. Ticketmaster (tel: (212) 307 7171; website: www.ticketmaster.com) is the best and most recognised way for one to purchase a ticket to a New York sporting event.

 

Major_League_teams
Major League teams

With two Major League teams, the baseball season, which runs from April to October, attracts huge crowds to two major stadiums in the area. Shea Stadium, 123–01 Roosevelt Avenue, Flushing, Queens (tel: (718) 507 METS or 6387 or TIXX or 8499 for tickets), is home to the New York Mets (website: www.mets.com). The New York Yankees (website: www.yankees.com), the most successful baseball team in US history, can be found at Yankee Stadium, East 161st Street and River Avenue, in the Bronx (tel: (718) 293 6000).

 

The local basketball season runs from October to April. MadisonSquareGarden, Seventh Avenue, between 31st Street and 33rd Street, Manhattan (tel: (212) 465 6741; website: www.thegarden.com), is the home of the celebrated New York Knickerbockers, or Knicks (website: www.nba.com/knicks), as well as New York Liberty (website: www.wnba.com/liberty), the popular women’s team.

 

American football teams from New York include the Giants (tel: (201) 935 8222; website: www.giants.com) and New York Jets (tel: (516) 560 8200; website: www.newyorkjets.com). The American football season kicks off in September. These two leading teams now play in New Jersey, at the Giants Stadium, in the Meadowlands Sports Complex (tel: (201) 935 3900; website: www.meadowlands.com). Tickets sell out well in advance and there are long waiting lists.

 

National Hockey League
National Hockey League

Ice hockey is also hugely popular and the National Hockey League (NHL) teams include the local New York Rangers (website: www.newyorkrangers.com). The team plays at MadisonSquareGarden (see above). Other local teams include New York Islanders (tel: (800) 883 ISLES or (800) 8834 7537; website: www.newyorkislanders.com), whose home ground is the Nassau Coliseum, 1255 Hempstead Turnpike, Uniondale (tel: (516) 794 9300; website: www.nassaucoliseum.com), and New Jersey Devils (website: www.newjerseydevils.com), who play at the Meadowlands Sports Complex (tel: (201) 935 3900; website: www.meadowlands.com).

 

The Arthur Ashe Stadium, Flushing Meadows, Queens, hosts the US Open Tennis Championships (website: www.usta.com), which takes place in late August to early September, featuring some of the world’s top seeded players.

 

Beaches: There are several beaches in New York City, such as Coney Island, BrightonBeach and Manhattan Beach. The best beaches for tanning and swimming, however, are located on Long Island (see Excursions).

 

Bowling: Bowlmor Lanes, 110 University Place, between 12th Street and 13th Street (tel: (212) 255 8188), is Manhattan’s premier bowling centre with 42 lanes and an atmosphere of 1950s kitsch. The venue, which serves pricey cocktails, becomes a veritable nightclub on some evenings, when it is open until the wee hours, with a DJ and glow-in-dark bowling on offer.

 

Fitness centres: The Sports Center at Chelsea Piers, Pier 60, 23rd Street (tel: (212) 336 6000; website: www.chelseapiers.com), is a 14,000sq-metre (150,000sq-foot) adult sports and fitness club. Facilities include an indoor track and swimming pool, sundecks, basketball courts, an indoor sand volleyball court, boxing ring, rock climbing wall and gym. Day membership passes cost US$50 and allow access to all facilities.

 

The Black Course at BethpageState Park
The Black Course at BethpageState Park

Golf: The Black Course at BethpageState Park, 99 Quaker Meeting House Road, Farmingdale (tel: (516) 249 0700), was the first public golf course to host the US Open. It is located just east of the city, on Long Island. Play costs approximately US$30, depending upon the course chosen. Clearview Golf Club, 202–12 Willets Point Boulevard (tel: (718) 225 4653), is open to the public for US$22 (weekdays) and US$24 (weekends). The Golf Club at Chelsea Piers, Pier 59, 23rd Street (tel: (212) 336 6400; website: www.chelseapiers.com), is America’s most high-tech super range. There is a 200-yard fairway, all-weather driving range, putting green and a full-service GolfAcademy. A session on the driving range starts at US$20 and prices rise with the number of balls used in session. American Golf (website: www.americangolf.com) allows online booking of tee times.

 

Horseracing: New Yorkers love the races and the main racetracks include Aqueduct Racetrack, OzonePark, Queens (tel: (718) 641 4700), and Meadowlands Racetrack, East Rutherford (tel: (201) 935 8500).

 

Running: New York Road Runners Club, 9 East 89th Street, between Madison Avenue and Fifth Avenue (tel: (212) 860 4455; website: www.nyrr.org), are the organisers of the NYC Marathon and promote the sport through races, events and publications.

 

Chelsea Marina at Chelsea Piers
Chelsea Marina at Chelsea Piers

Sailing: Chelsea Marina at Chelsea Piers, West 23rd Street (tel: (212) 336 5600; website: www.chelseapiers.com), is the city’s largest marina, featuring a sailing school as well as boats for dinner cruising and deep-sea fishing.

 

Skating/ice skating: The Roller Rinks at Chelsea Piers, Pier 62, 23rd Street (tel: (212) 336 6200; website: www.chelseapiers.com), has two indoor ice skating rinks, two outdoor in-line/roller skating rinks and a skate park. There are two outdoor ice skating rinks with skate hire in Central Park, 59th Street to 110th Street, and one in the Rockefeller Center, Fifth Avenue, 47th Street to 52nd Street (see Sightseeing).

 

Tennis: The tennis courts at Central Park, located at 93rd Street (tel: (212) 280 0201), are open to the public during the summer.

 

 

Bryant Park

New York, Further Distractions

American Museum of the Moving Image
American Museum of the Moving Image

American Museum of the Moving Image
A target destination for serious film buffs, the American Museum of the Moving Image is dedicated to film, television, video and interactive media. Attractions and facilities include classic movies screened daily in the Tut’s Fever Movie Palace; feature films shown at weekends in the Riklis Theater and interactive exhibitions, including a working film set and film editing demonstrations.

35th Avenue, at 36th Street, Astoria, Queens
Tel: (718) 784 0077 or 4520.

Transport: Subway N to Broadway, R or G to Steinway Street.
Opening hours: Tues–Fri 1200–1700, Sat and Sun 1100–1800.
Admission: US$10 (concessions available).

Bryant Park
Bryant Park

Bryant Park

Bryant Park, behind the New York Public Library, is reminiscent of Paris, with gravel pathways, green folding chairs and a manicured lawn. It is extremely popular during summer, especially as it offers free outdoor concerts and comedy shows. During Fashion Week, tents concealing the hallowed runways are set up for the seasonal haute couture fashion shows. Two lions flank the grand New York Public Library, with its entrance on Fifth Avenue, where visitors may tour the impressive reading rooms and literary exhibitions.

Between 40th Street and 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue
Tel: (212) 768 4242.
E‐mail: bprc@urbanmgt.com

Transport: Subway B, D, F, V and 7 to 42nd Street.
Opening hours: Daily 0700–1900 (Nov–Apr); Mon–Fri 0700–2300, Sat and Sun 0700–2000 (May, Sep and Oct); Mon–Fri 0700–2300, Sat and Sun 0700–2100 (Jun–Aug).
Admission: Free.

New York Public Library
New York Public Library

New York Public Library
Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street
Tel: (212) 930 0830 or 0800.

Opening hours: Tues–Wed. 1100–1930 Thurs–Sat 1000–1800.
Admission: Free.

Grand Central Terminal
Grand Central Terminal
Visitors to New York should take the opportunity to tour Grand Central Terminal, familiar to many as Grand Central Station. Situated in Midtown, just one block east of Bryant Park, it has historical and architectural importance and the celestial ceiling is remarkable. Free tours take place every Wednesday and Friday at 1230. The Wednesday tour is run by the Municipal Arts Society and departs from the information booth of the Grand Concourse, while the Friday tour, run by the Grand Central Partnership, meets in front of the Phillip Morris/Whitney Museum on 42nd Street. The station also boasts a fine dining concourse and a number of retail opportunities, including the Grand Central Market.

42nd Street, at Park Avenue
Tel: (212) 935 3960 (Wednesday tour) or 697 1245 (Friday tour) or 340 2210 (event hotline).
or www.newyorkled.com/grandcentral.htm
Transport: MTA Metro–North Railroad; subway 4, 5, 6, 7 and S; bus 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 42, 98, 101 and 102.
Opening hours: Daily 0530–0130.
Admission: Free.

Chrysler Building and Daily News Building
Many a tourist has had their breath taken away by the stunning chrome Chrysler Building. Unfortunately, tours are not available. Further down 42nd Street is the Daily News Building, with its lobby, made famous in the Superman films, which still contains the original 1923 large globe.

Chrysler Building
42nd Street at Lexington Avenue
Tel: (212) 682 3070.

Transport: Subway B, D, F, V and 7 to 42nd Street.
Opening hours: Visitors usually admitted into the lobby during weekday working hours; permission is essential as sneaking in may result in arrest.
Admission: Free.

Daily News Building
220 East 42nd Street
Transport: Subway B, D, F, V and 7 to 42nd Street.
Opening hours: Visitors usually admitted into the lobby during weekday working hours; permission is essential as sneaking in may result in arrest.
Admission: Free.

Dia Center
Dia Center

Dia Center
The Dia Center is dedicated to large‐scale, long‐term, single‐artist projects. The most famous is Dan Graham’s site‐specific glass installation on the roof, which reflects and distorts the surrounding views of Manhattan. Photographs of the bookshop have appeared in many design magazines.

548 West 22nd Street, between Tenth Avenue and 11th Avenue
Tel: (212) 989 5566. Fax: (212) 989 4055.

Transport: Subway C or E to 23rd Street.
Opening hours: Wed–Sun 1200–1800.
Admission: US$6 (concessions available).

The Lower East Side

This is New York’s landmark historic Jewish neighborhood, which was once the world’s largest Jewish community. It was here that the New York garment industry began. Today it is one of New York’s favorite bargain beats, where serious shoppers find fantastic bargains (especially along Orchard Street on a Sunday afternoon), cutting-edge new designers, and hot bars and music venues – and possibly the best place to get a great pastrami sandwich, pickles out of a barrel, and the world’s best bialys. Try Katz’s Delicatessen (205 East Houston St.), the oldest and largest real NY deli, founded in 1888.

lower_East_Side

Bounded by Houston Street, Canal Street, and the FDR Drive, the neighborhood’s center is Orchard Street. Once a Jewish wholesale enclave, this street is a true multicultural blend, with trendy boutiques, French cafés, and velvet-roped nightspots sprinkled among dry-goods discounters, Spanish bodegas, and mom-and-pop shops selling everything from T-shirts to designer fashions to menorahs. Orchard is lined with small shops purveying clothing and shoes at great prices. Grand, Orchard, and Delancey Streets are treasure troves for linens, towels, and other housewares, and the traditional Sunday street vendors (Saturday, the Jewish Sabbath, is observed by many shopkeepers as a day of rest) offer great opportunities to hone your bargaining skills! At Shapiro’s Winery visitors can taste one of their 32 flavors of wine, and at Streit’s bakery, matzoh mavens can sample the freshly baked unleavened bread as it rolls off the conveyor belts behind the counter.

Timeline Touring offers insider tours that relate to this historic period by exploring the culture and heritage that existed then and still exists today. Transportation provided. Tours leave from the NYC visitor center.

The Lower East Side Tenement Museum interprets the area’s immigrant and migrant experiences through tours of a landmark 19th century tenement, living history programs, neighborhood walking tours, plays, and special programs. The first synagogue built by Eastern European Jews in America (1887) is the Eldridge Street Project, now a cultural center and gift shop.